Browsing: algorithmic trading

Posts Tagged ‘ algorithmic trading ’

Ramsay on the Stay of the TFP: Reform will Proceed

Apr 9th, 2019 | Filed under: Newly Added, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, The A.I. Industry, Business News

The Securities and Exchange Commission recently imposed a stay on part of its transaction fee pilot (TFP). There is understandably a good deal of debate about the significance of this stay. The TFP, initiated in December 2018 with the expectation that it would run for at least one year, andRead More


High-Frequency-Trading Firms: Fast, Faster, Fastest

Apr 2nd, 2019 | Filed under: Newly Added, Hedge Fund Industry Trends, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Hedge Fund Strategies, The A.I. Industry, Equity Hedge Funds, Hedge Funds, Business News

Many high-frequency trading (HFT) firms have disappeared into larger firms as merger activity has increased recently. Those acquired include Chopper, Infinium, Teza, RGM Advisors, and Sun Trading. It also includes Getco, the Chicago-based firm founded in 1999 by two former floor traders that almost defined the field for some time.Read More


Algorithms Moving into the Bond Markets

Mar 17th, 2019 | Filed under: Newly Added, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, The A.I. Industry, Risk management, Risk Metrics and Measurement, Risk Management Strategies & Processes

Algorithmic trading may fairly be said to have conquered the public equities world, although there are still pockets of resistance and related controversies. The robots have now turned their attention to the bond markets. Bond markets are different from stock markets in a lot of ways, and many of theseRead More


Inaccurate News Analytics: When Robots Get Things Wrong

Aug 28th, 2018 | Filed under: Newly Added, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, The A.I. Industry, Equity Hedge Funds, Hedge Funds, Event-Driven Hedge Funds, Business News

A new study prepared for the Federal Reserve Board looks at the use of algorithms to read and interpret financial news. While there have been a lot of studies that have looked at this topic, one unique feature of this new paper, “First to ‘Read’ the News,” is that itRead More


Quants and Fundamentalists Unite!

May 31st, 2018 | Filed under: Newly Added, Hedge Fund Industry Trends, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, The A.I. Industry, Hedge Funds, Fees, Structure of the Hedge Funds Industry

By standard definition, a “quantitative” investing strategy is one that selects securities using customized models, often algorithm-driven and thus on the operational level independent of human judgment. Again working from standard definitions, a “fundamental” investing strategy involves an examination of whether the entity issuing a security (corporation, sovereign, or other)Read More


What Makes Big Data So … Big?

Mar 22nd, 2018 | Filed under: Newly Added, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Business News, Finance & Economics

The term “big data” has become a cliché. One has to remind one’s self that it is a somewhat ill-fitting label. What is new about the world of data isn’t that there is a lot of it; nor that on the software end the processing of data becomes easier overRead More


The Quants, the Algorithms, and the Performance

Mar 18th, 2018 | Filed under: Newly Added, Alpha & Beta, Benchmarking & Performance Attribution, Hedge Funds, Allocating to A.I.

A new paper by J.B. Heaton, forthcoming in the Journal of Financial Transformation, offers a skeptical view of the algorithmic trading of securities, its actuality and its potential. Heaton is a lawyer (admitted to the bars of both Illinois and New York) and has a Ph.D. in finance, University ofRead More


Algorithmic Traders: Proprietary, Agency, Liquidity

Nov 9th, 2017 | Filed under: Newly Added, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Business News, Finance & Economics

Two scholars affiliated with the Indian Institute of Management, in Calcutta, have posted a paper about the effects of algorithmic trading on liquidity. This paper, by Samarpan Nawn and Ashok Banerjee, based on the first chapter of Nawn’s Ph.D. dissertation, distinguishes sharply between proprietary algorithmic traders and agency algorithmic traders,Read More


UC Berkeley: Stale Prices Not a Threat to Liquidity Takers

Sep 7th, 2016 | Filed under: Newly Added, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Equity Hedge Funds, Alpha Strategies, Hedge Funds, Business News, Finance & Economics

Two scholars associated with the University of California, Berkeley, have argued in a recent paper that there is less to latency arbitrage, or at least to a certain paradigmatic sort of latency arb, than meets the eye. Robert P. Bartlett III and Justin McCrary used data from the Securities InformationRead More


BATS, Spoofing, and Shifting Definitions

Sep 22nd, 2015 | Filed under: Business News

BATS now proposes to define spoofing in an elaborate and narrow two-part manner. An investor, commenting to the SEC, accurately notes that this is a good deal different from the statutory definition, or from a definition endorsed recently in another context by BATS itself.Read More


Spoofing: The ‘It’ Enforcement Action

Jun 17th, 2015 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Hedge Fund Strategies, Derivatives, Regulatory, Technology

Spoofing is probably about as ubiquitous as texting-while-driving. And it is possible to make an example of a spoofer caught red-handed. But it isn't clear what purpose that will serve. The real problem is that a broken market contains a broken set of incentives. Read More


SIP and the Law of Unintended Consequences

Aug 12th, 2014 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Regulatory, Technology

Christopher Faille reviews the basic facts about SIP, the Securities Information Processor, and cites (with some incredulity) a new contention in some quarters that SIP isn't all that important because nobody really relies upon it. Read More


New Tweaks to MiFID/MiFIR Recall College Daze

Jun 18th, 2013 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Regulatory

MiFIR includes provisions that allow for "dark pools" and that limit the size -- or, if you will, the depth -- of such pools. On June 10, 2013, authorities in Brussels released a new proposal for tweaks of MiFIR in general and these provisions in particular.Read More


B of E Studies HFT: Begins and Ends with Ambivalence

Jan 6th, 2013 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Alpha Strategies

Bank of England white paper on high-frequency trading yields little in the way of return.Read More


Mixed Report on HFT from Brits’ Foresight Project

Oct 31st, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading

The report seeks to alleviate certain concerns about both high-frequency and algorithmic trading. In particular, "The evidence available to this Project provides no direct evidence that computer-based HFT has increased volatility in financial markets." Still, the absence of evidence is not the evidence of absence, and the Project does acknowledge prudential concerns. Read More


Hull Warns of HFT Cancellations & the Illusion of Liquidity

Oct 17th, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading

The real problem behind the 2010 flash crash, Hull says, is that again as in 1987 (in a different way of course) traders were working within a market structure that allowed “the illusion of liquidity” to displace the real thing. He cites an authority, because as he says his firm, Ketchum, likes to stay close to the academic literature.Read More


People as Market Makers Were Never Crash Insurance Either

Aug 30th, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Alpha Strategies

The new technologies make less difference than some might think. "Even back in the days of physical market makers, when things went bad, as for example in the crash of '87, the market makers would head for the hills," said James Angel. Nowadays the computers go dark. Or (worse) they don't.Read More


Citi: Systematic Component in CTAs Dominate over Discretionary Bits

Jul 24th, 2012 | Filed under: Commodities, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, CTA

There has been a perhaps-unexpected consequence of the disappearance of the old-fashioned floor traders. Floor trading used to serve as a training regimen, "from which many of the industry's leading discretionary traders originated." Without the floors, the talent pool has dried up.Read More


CFTC Working Group Tries to Define High Frequency Trading

Jul 5th, 2012 | Filed under: Commodities, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading

Here is a draft definition of high frequency trading presented to the CFTC on June 20. HFT is a form of automated trading that employs: (a) algorithms for decision making, order initiation, generation, routing, or execution, for each individual transaction without human direction; (b) low-latency technology that is designed to minimize response times, including proximity and co-location services; (c) high-speed connections to markets for order entry; and (d) high message rates (orders, quotes, or cancellations).Read More


The Ultimate in High-Frequency Trading

May 9th, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Alpha Strategies

Quite aside from the neat through-the-planet short-cuts they might allow: how fast is a neutrino? This turns out to be a very controversial matter. Last year, scientists working at CERN set off weeks of feverish speculation with reports indicating that neutrinos travel faster than light. If I understand this at all, it would mean if true that a New York or London trader could in theory accept a Tokyo trader’s offer before the offer had actually been made. Now that would be the ultimate in HFT: negative latency. Read More


No Federal Prohibition on Stealing Code for Trading Infrastructure

Apr 18th, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Regulatory

Chief Judge Dennis Jacons said that the statutory language refers on the one hand to products that have “already been introduced into [placed in] the stream of commerce” and on the other hand to those that “are still being developed or readied” [produced for] such placement. The words evoke two distinct sets of products with a sequential relationship to one another, which satisfies well-established rules of statutory construction. The district court had upheld the indictment against challenge along these lines, because the district court had construed the language to include the production of anything whose purpose is “to facilitate or engage in such commerce.” The appeals court panel found error here.Read More


Conversing with the Oracles of The Daily Delphi

Mar 26th, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading

The Internet and technology have changed the face of trading forever. To get a glimpse of the future we sat down with the oracles of The Daily Delphi to see what the next newest thing might be.Read More


Axioma to Quants: Beware of Cherry Picking by Optimizers

Mar 15th, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading

Reliance on optimization tools that in turn rely on standard “user risk factors” will make factor alignment worse, caution three executives of Axioma. An optimizer will cherry pick “the aspects of the model of expected returns that it deems desirable when gauged on the yardstick of marginal contribution to systemic risk.” This amounts to making, and betting on, the erroneous assumption that a lack of correlation with the used risk factors is a lack of systemic risk altogether.Read More


Algo Trading: Life in the Cross-Hairs

Mar 8th, 2012 | Filed under: Hedge Fund Regulation, Algorithmic and high-frequency trading

Three lawyers with Covington & Burlington write about the new intensified scrutiny to which regulators are subjecting algorihtmic and high frequency trading. They place it in the context of an old dispute over what constitutes market manipulation. According to the broadest view, if a trader's 'sole intent' in making even a quite ordinary buy or sell order is to move the price, then the resulting trade is market manipulation.Read More


Aleynikov Released: Second Circuit Doesn’t Love a Wall

Feb 27th, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Hedge Fund Strategies, Alpha Strategies

Some managers of HFT or algorithmic funds must have felt some relief upon the arrest of Sergey Aleynikov in July 2009, his conviction in December 2010, or his imprisonment the following March. Programmers in the financial world were put on notice that criminal prosecution was among the possible consequences were they to treat their knowledge of their employer's edge as a marketable commodity. Thus, the news on Friday [February 17, 2012] that Aleynikov is now a free man came as something of a jolt. Read More