Browsing: Derivatives

Posts Tagged ‘ Derivatives ’

A Proposed Model for VIX Derivatives Pricing

Feb 14th, 2019 | Filed under: Newly Added, Derivatives, The A.I. Industry, Commodities, Structured Products

The VIX may be about to get some competition. VIX is the “fear gauge,” the very visible measure of expected price fluctuations in the S&P 500 index options. On the foundation of its popularity, CBOE has built a monopoly on exchange-traded volatility products. VIX derivatives have become among the mostRead More


Can LIBOR Be Replaced?

Feb 12th, 2019 | Filed under: Newly Added, Derivatives, The A.I. Industry, Credit Derivatives, Economics, Macroeconomics, Structured Products, Finance & Economics

Given a long wave of scandals that lasted from 2008 until 2012, most of the derivatives industry, and most of its regulators, have agreed that the London Interbank Offered rate [Libor] ought to be replaced by a more tamper-resistant mechanism. Surely there must be an index that will measure theRead More


CEOs and the effect of education on use of convertible bonds

Nov 29th, 2018 | Filed under: Newly Added, Derivatives, The A.I. Industry, Credit Derivatives, Equity-linked Structured Products, Structured Credit Products, Structured Products, Finance & Economics

Three scholars affiliated with the University of Manchester have  published a paper that reaches a striking view of corporate leadership and the decision to issue convertible bonds. Cynics have long suspected that Wall Street smart-alecks have roped the executives of corporations into issuing instruments that are contrary to the bestRead More


Hedging or Trading? Why Italian Banks Use Derivatives

Aug 23rd, 2018 | Filed under: Newly Added, Derivatives, The A.I. Industry, Risk management, Hedge Funds, Credit Derivatives, The Global Economy & Currencies, Commodities, Economics, Institutional Asset Management, Risk Management Strategies & Processes, Risk Management & Operations

A recent report by the Bank of Italy looks at why the various banks of Italy use derivatives. Specifically, the central bank of that country wanted to know: is it a matter of hedging? Or is it a matter of keeping a proprietary book? Hedge fund managers and other pursuersRead More


Networks, Modeling, and Funds of Funds

Aug 8th, 2017 | Filed under: Newly Added, The A.I. Industry, Financial Economics Theory, Alternative Investments in Context, Finance & Economics

Two scholars affiliated with FERI Trust, a leading investment manager of the German-speaking countries of Europe, have written a study of hedge fund strategies that uses a “network-based analysis” thereof. The two authors, Eduard Baitinger and Thomas Maier, argue that hedge fund strategies show “numerous network-based properties” which help explainRead More


The State of the OTC Index Dividend Swap Market

Feb 9th, 2017 | Filed under: Newly Added, Derivatives, Equity-linked Structured Products, Structured Products, Risk Management & Operations

In a new article in the Journal of Alternative Investments, Scott Mixon and Esen Onur quantify the over the counter index dividend swap market. Along the way, they provide a good example of the scientific method: positing a relationship, testing it against the data, and then abandoning it when theRead More


Headline vs. Core Inflation: We Shouldn’t Have Laughed

Aug 4th, 2016 | Filed under: Newly Added, Investing in Commodities, Hedge Funds, Commodities, Structure of the Hedge Funds Industry

I’m old enough to remember the 1970s, and to remember the economic debates in the United States at the time concerning the inflation of that era. The U.S. left the Bretton Woods system near the start of the decade, thus ushering the “free float” of currencies against one another inRead More


The SEC: Still Fiddling with a 1940 Era Carburetor 

May 3rd, 2016 | Filed under: Newly Added, The A.I. Industry, Liquid Alternative Investiments, Alternative Mutual Funds, Regulatory, Regulatory Environment, Liquid Alts, Other Topics in A.I.

Steven A. Keen of Perkins Coie has posted an insightful discussion of section 18 of the Investment Company Act of 1940, and of the pending proposed regulation under that mandate, Rule 18f-4, on one of that firm’s blogs, the Derivatives & Repo Report. Both that proposal and Keen’s observations areRead More


Brexit and Derivatives: Allen & Overy’s Views

May 1st, 2016 | Filed under: Newly Added, The A.I. Industry, Due Diligence Process, Regulatory Environment, Risk Management & Operations

A decision by the United Kingdom to leave the European Union could be a bad thing for the derivatives markets. But from a legal standpoint there isn’t a lot that can be done about it in advance, and the existing Master Agreement for derivatives needs no change. Those are theRead More


A Fresh Look at Bubbles: Revising Assumptions

Sep 16th, 2015 | Filed under: CAPM / Alpha Theory, Derivatives

If it is possible for bubbles to arise in frictionless circumstances, then it follows that any theory that treats bubbles as the consequence of friction is, at very best, incomplete. And that is important to know especially if policy makers are busy drawing their own conclusions from those incomplete-or-worse theories. Read More


Usury Law: Not Too far From the Madden Crowd

Jul 7th, 2015 | Filed under: Derivatives, Regulatory, Legislation/Court rulings

National and international markets have long been accustomed to the fact that various states in the United States have their own usury laws. Still, litigation in the 2d Circuit, arising out of New York, may have a substantial impact on credit markets and their derivatives. Read More


On First Looking Into SEC’s Homer: A Final Rule on Swaps Reporting

Feb 23rd, 2015 | Filed under: Derivatives, Regulatory

Commenters successful pressed for certain changes in this massive new rule during its years of gestation. For example, the rule incorporates a T + 24 approach for the reporting of block trades. But warned, though, blizzards in NYC don't stop the ticking of that 24 hour clock. Read More


How Not to Nationalize the Clearinghouses

Aug 17th, 2014 | Filed under: Derivatives, Risk management, Insolvency

Let's not make clearinghouses too big to fail. Or if, through, Dodd-Frank, we already have, let's turn back and reconsider that decision. That's how not to end up bailing them out or nationalizing them in due course. Read More


Basel/IOSCO ‘Near Final’ Proposal: Part Two

Mar 3rd, 2013 | Filed under: Derivatives, Regulatory, Forex

This is the second of a two-part discussion of a paper jointly issued by Basel and IOSCO on margin requirements for non-centrally cleared derivatives. The new paper solicits feedback on the phase-in timeline it proposes, a phase-in designed to provide flexibility so the affected markets can meet "operational and logistical challenges" by which they might otherwise be stymied. Read More


Basel/IOSCO ‘Near Final’ Proposal: Part One

Feb 28th, 2013 | Filed under: Derivatives, Regulatory

This is the first of a two-part discussion of a paper jointly issued by Basel and IOSCO on margin requirements for non-centrally cleared derivatives. The new paper solicits feedback on only four still-open issues, and the list of issues itself illustrates the near finality they claim for this paper.Read More


Buy Side PMs Must Plan for Collateral Crunch

Dec 19th, 2012 | Filed under: Derivatives

As the reforms come on line, or as the asset management industry makes its adjustments in anticipation thereof, the initial margin requirements will be a big hurdle, in part because CCPs are quite restrictive about what assets are eligible as collateral. This may set the industry up for a collateral crunch. Read More


Malaysian Derivatives Trading and Investor Memories

Jun 25th, 2012 | Filed under: Derivatives, Alpha Strategies

In a presentation about Malaysian derivatives trading, the issue of capital controls, and memories of the late 1990s, briefly came to the fore. Assume that a foreign investor considers Malaysia a promising place to invest. Will this investor be confident that if he does so he’ll be in a position to repatriate at his own choosing?Read More


Banks Aren’t Really Much Like Dominoes

Jun 20th, 2012 | Filed under: Derivatives

As a recent paper from four scholars at the Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, in Spain, observes, the extra flexibility risk managers gain from using credit derivatives comes with drawbacks. Perhaps the most obvious of drawbacks is that it creates counter-party risk. Still, the authors: Luis Otero González, Luis Ignacio Rodriguez Gil, Sara Cantorna Agra, and Pablo Durán Santomil, have written “Banking Risk and Credit Derivatives,” in order to take an empirical look at the balance of pros and cons. Read More


Credit Suisse: Making Fat Tails Work for You

Apr 25th, 2012 | Filed under: Derivatives, Alpha Strategies

The new normal, on Thambiah’s and Foscari’s account, includes an enhanced role by central banks, implementing monetary policies through open market operations, closer interconnections of banking institutions worldwide, much painful deleveraging, and persistently high levels of unemployment. Read More


Looking for Abnormal Market Activity

Apr 3rd, 2012 | Filed under: Algorithmic and high-frequency trading, Derivatives

Cinnober has sold a customized form of its Scila Surveillance software -- a product designed to detect abnormal market behavior -- to the Qatar Exchange. One of the purposes of Scila Surveillance is the detection of harmful variants of algorithmic trading, such as the trading "snipers" who drive off market makers and reduce liquidity. Read More